Category Archives: Exercise

Pilates for Teenagers

Pilates for Teenagers?

Even now I remember the feeling of a heavy school bag on my shoulders and tired, achey muscles after a football match. Teenage bodies undergo stresses from changes in posture and growing as well as the demands of school and sports. I wish I had known about Pilates rather than being told to hurry on and stop complaining!!

Was I truly a lazy, grumpy teenager or was my back really sore after the soccer blitz? Would I have tidied my room if my legs didn’t ache from football training? I might even have sat up straight at the table if I actually knew how to sit comfortably in correct posture!
Imagine having the chance to stretch those overworked muscles and relieve the dreaded growing pains, all while moving to good music with people your own age?
The feeling of strength and power that comes from using our muscles properly gives us an advantage on the playing field and prevents pains and aches, now or in the future!
 

Why Pilates for Teenagers?

Pilates is a wonderful way of providing whole body exercise for both the non-athletic and the competitive sporty teenagers. Pilates is a great way of getting reluctant growing teenagers to participate in exercise because it caters to their various ages, fitness levels, and athletic abilities. A Teenage Pilates class comprises safe exercises to help increase flexibility and coordination while also improving strength, balance and performance in sport. It is the form of exercise that works the entire body with emphasis on function. It is fantastic for the growing years, supporting good body alignment. Pilates helps teenagers gain awareness of their own body and understand its workings. It helps to improve the way their body functions, looks and feels – and knowing their body inside and out leads to greater self-esteem.
 

Why Teenage Pilates at Cahir Physiotherapy Clinic?

Pilates for Teenagers CahirAt Cahir Physiotherapy Clinic our Teenage Pilates has been specifically designed by us- Chartered Physiotherapists- to help suit the demands of the teenagers we see in the clinic. As such, we understand that both non-sporty teens and competitive teenage athletes benefit from exercises that specifically target posture, alignment, core strength, coordination, balance and flexibility. For all teenagers, improving these attributes builds a positive self image. For teenage athletes, the Teenage Pilates class are beneficial for prevention of sports injury, rehabilitation post injury and improved sports performance. 

When are the classes?

The classes are run on Wednesdays at 4pm at Cahir Physiotherapy Clinic. The classes are based on fun small group setting -maximum 8 participants per class. Call the clinic today 0527445477 to book your place. Parental or guardian consent is mandatory.
Marie
Marie Aherne is a Chartered Physiotherapist who has been teaching Pilates for 4 years. She is a graduate of the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and is currently undertaking a Masters Degree in Sports Physiotherapy at University of Bath. She is the  Chartered Physiotherapist to the Tipperary Senior Football team.
 

Farmers Exercise- Now!

Attention Farmers

Sports Physio tipperary farmers exerciseNow that the cattle are indoors and the cows are dried off, it’s a great opportunity for farmers to look after themselves. It’s a great time to start feeling better and getting fit in the process. Farmers exercise often gets neglected when times are hectic. Now is an ideal time to start exercising. After all.. it’s only 10 weeks to the first of February.

Springtime Madness

It’s only 10 weeks until the first of February. This is when dairy farmers in particular get very very busy.  As a dairy farmer’s wife (daughter and sister too!), I know the Spring is very busy. This is usually when calving cows and rearing calves takes priority over exercise and even family! We see farmers every Spring in the clinic, towards the end of March and in April, with low back pain and shoulder pain. They are often exhausted from weeks of very long days and interrupted sleep. Exercising now will get you ready for the hard work ahead and reduce your risk of injury.

You now have the time

A farmer’s work is done in the daylight mostly. This time of year, there is a window of opportunity between 5pm and 7pm, for farmers to exercise. It’s as simple as going into your local town or village any evening and doing a brisk walk for 20  minutes non- stop. It’s only about a mile and a half to walk. The important word here is ‘brisk’. Walking through the fields, unless at a brisk pace and non-stop, does not benefit you in the same way (though better than the quad!).

How often should I exercise?

You need to be doing this 20 minutes non-stop brisk walk at least 5 times a week- that’s Monday, Wednesday, Friday and both Saturday and Sunday. Saturday and Sunday go with friends, or go in the morning, just for variety. Better still, take a different route in the daylight. Gradually, increase the time to 30 minutes over the next few weeks.

How fast is brisk walking?

Brisk walking means that you should be breathing faster than at rest and be getting warm from your exercise. You should be able to talk, but not as easily as if you were standing still.

Alternatives to walking

If you really dislike walking, or have an injury that means you can’t walk for exercise , you have a few other options. An exercise bike is a great option as you can do this at home or in your local gym. The swimming pool is a nice alternative if you can’t walk as you can get the exercise without the landing on the ground. We run Pilates classes here at the clinic. Most towns and villages have some exercise classes or a gym- get good advice on your gym exercises if it’s new to you. Finally, last but certainly not least, dance classes- set dancing and social dancing- are a brilliant, fun way to get and stay fit.

Mens Health

If you haven’t exercised in a while, or especially if you get chest pain or arm pain occasionally, please see your GP before starting your exercise. It would be no harm if you haven’t seen your GP in over a year to have a check-up anyway. Movember is a great campaign to raise awareness of mens health. Early detection of most diseases leads to better outcomes.

Have fun!

Karen

 

 

GAA Warm up Worth Doing

Tipperary GAA warm upIt’s March- the Tipperary GAA county football league and Under-21 championship have started. It’s a great time to remind you about the importance of a good warm up to prevent injuries in hurling and football. There is lots of evidence from sports science and medicine research that a well planned warm up reduces the number of injuries in a squad. So from a success and a costs point of view it’s worth doing!

Gone, hopefully, are the days of lads and lassies running straight out of the dressing room and hoofing a big kick of a football over the bar. That is a recipe for a pulled hamstring or pulled muscle in the front of your thigh.. and a few weeks of missed training. For GAA hurling and football coaches, the warm up is an ideal opportunity to regularly coach injury prevention exercises to keep the squad as healthy as possible all season.

Important parts of a warm up

The pace of the GAA warm up should be graduated so that it starts easy and builds up over the duration of the warm up to get to the pace of the training session. So the first few drills of a warm up should be easy to do, and the last few drills before starting training properly should be at training intensity. There should be ‘activation’ exercises to wake up your reactions for demanding activities like running, landing and rapid changes of direction. It should include leg strengthening exercises, like lunges and squats. Finally, it should include agility and power exercises.

The GAA have recently launched a warm up GAA 15 that includes exercises which, when coached regularly, have been proven to reduce the number of injuries in squads. It is a really useful tool for coaches to use and incorporate into their own warm ups for their football and hurling teams.

Frozen Shoulder- how can physiotherapy help?

Frozen shoulder is a condition that affects both men and women in which the shoulder becomes painful initially and then very stiff. It affects normal daily activities, like brushing hair and getting dressed and driving. It mostly occurs in patients between the ages of 40 and 65 years of age and it usually lasts 1- 2 years.

What causes frozen shoulder?

Cahir Physiotherapist frozen shoulderWhen a patient arrives at the clinic, they usually say that they can’t remember ‘hurting it’ and say that the pain started for no particular reason. There are some people more prone to this condition than others, those with Diabetes or a heart or lung disease.

Frozen shoulder occurs when there is swelling and thickening of the stretchy covering that surrounds your shoulder joint. This tissue is known as a capsule. In cases of frozen shoulder, it seems that bands of scar tissue form inside this tissue, causing it to thicken, swell and tighten.

Stages of Frozen Shoulder

There are usually 3 phases of variable duration of the condition. Initially the patient complains of increasing pain with normal daily activities and later on the shoulder becomes stiffer. This phase can last anything from 2 to 9 months. In the second stage, the pain stops getting worse or may improve, but the shoulder stiffness is worst- ‘frozen’ and is quite debilitating. This stage lasts from 4-9 months. Finally, the pain subsides and the shoulder gradually regains movement ‘thaws’.

Physiotherapy for Frozen Shoulder

It is a common occurence that a patient would arrive in the clinic complaining of a frozen shoulder, when they may have a different shoulder condition. A Chartered Physiotherapist will ask  you lots of questions to ensure that you are treated correctly. At all stages of the condition, physiotherapy is aimed at reducing pain and maintaining movement, education about the condition and encouraging normal movement. It is really important to try to use the shoulder as much as possible. Ice and heat may help with symptoms. Your General Practitioner may suggest a corticosteroid injection also.  The combination of injection and physiotherapy has been found in research to be helpful to relieve symptoms.

 

Post Storm Exercise

 

Post storm exercise

For the past two weeks the main topic of conversation in the clinic with patients has been the bad storm. Electricity blackouts, trees down and no exercise done. In fact, since Christmas, anyone who ‘depends’ on the outdoors for exercise has been admitting to the lack of routine of walking/ running/cycling because of the bad weather and feeling worse for it.

Now this week things are not as bad- with the odd sunny spell it’s time to get back to your usual exercise regime. Take advantage of the short periods of calm nice weather and the stretch in the evenings to get back to exercising outdoors. Your back, neck and shoulders will thank you for it, not to mention your heart and lungs!